Assemble a Roadside Emergency Kit

From unpredictable weather to unexpected emergencies, there are many things that could leave you stuck on the side of the road when traveling from point A to point B. No matter how short the distance you’re traveling, keeping a roadside emergency kit in your vehicle can help give you peace of mind. Follow these steps to assemble one of your own, and make sure to take routine inventory. 

Emergency Supplies

A first aid kit is essential to have in your vehicle in case of an injury while on the road. Consider assembling your own kit or buying a pre-made kit. Use the American Red Cross guidelines to ensure your kit includes all the essentials. Some other emergency supplies you may want to keep in your vehicle include:

  • Bottles of water
  • Nonperishable food items
  • Blanket or sleeping bag
  • Matches
  • Phone charger

Vehicle Tools

Your vehicle will need its own toolkit in case of a roadside incident, like a flat tire or dead battery. You may be able to buy a vehicle toolkit or you can compile one of your own with these necessary items: 

  • Jumper cables
  • Tire pressure gauge
  • Work gloves and rags 
  • Flashlight and batteries
  • Hazard triangles or warning lights 
  • WD-40
  • Tow rope
  • Fire extinguisher 

Severe Weather Supplies 

Extreme weather events can happen suddenly and pose some serious risks if you’re unprepared. Should you find yourself facing freezing temperatures, ice or tornadoes while on the road, you’ll want to have these items stored and ready in your vehicle: 

  • Warm, waterproof boots
  • Hat, scarf and gloves
  • Antifreeze
  • Ice scraper
  • Shovel 
  • Road salt or sand

Keeping these items in your vehicle will help ensure you’re prepared for roadside emergencies, but you’ll also want to make sure you have auto insurance that offers you the protection you need. Contact your OKFB agent to discuss your auto policy and see if you may be eligible for our roadside assistance policy addition. 

Friday the 13th – 13 Hidden Risks

Many people are afraid of or superstitious of black cats, broken mirrors and walking under ladders around Friday the 13th, which will take place this December. However, what’s even more cause for caution is all the hidden risks that can be present in daily life. Check out these top 13 risks to be aware of: 

Eating while driving

Next to texting and driving, eating while driving is one of the most common forms of distracted driving. Reaction time drops by nearly 50% while eating. Next time you pick up food, make sure to wait until arrival before eating. 

Car maintenance

Without proper vehicle maintenance, driving a car can pose some risks. Change the oil in the vehicle as recommended, get tires checked regularly and make sure to have roadside assistance as part of your insurance policy. 

Lightning

While not extremely common, lightning can strike your car or home and cause damage that may require repairs. Make sure your insurance plan covers damage caused by lightning and help prevent damage by installing a lightning rod or other protection.

Cyber security

As the internet increasingly becomes part of the daily routine, cyber security is a necessity. Take steps to protect your information online from hackers or data breaches, including using complex passwords and being aware of email phishing scams. 

Texting 

Texting while doing other things is a huge distraction. Whether walking across the street or driving down the road, avoid texting and pay better attention to surroundings. 

Home security

Make sure to lock all doors and windows when leaving and consider installing an alarm system. If you’re an OKFB member, you may be eligible for a discount for installing a home security system. 

Fire 

It’s nice to have the fireplace crackling or a candle burning to provide warmth and comfort, but make sure to take the proper safety precautions. Always extinguish candles and fires before leaving a room, and make sure to keep them out of reach of children.  

Food storage

Improper food storage can result in spoiled foods, and if these foods are consumed they can result in illness. Hold cold foods at 40°F or below, and keep hot foods at 140°F or above. Regularly monitor your refrigerator and freezer to ensure they are at the right temperature. 

Carbon monoxide

Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless, odorless flammable gas that can be deadly. CO can accumulate wherever fuel is burned, whether by a kitchen stove or a car in the garage. Help avoid CO poisoning by installing carbon monoxide detectors in your home. 

Appliances

Appliances, especially those in the kitchen can pose some safety risks. Stay nearby appliances when cooking and always check that appliances are off before leaving the kitchen.  

Screens

Staring at a screen all day, whether via a phone or a computer, can pose some health risks. Excessive use can result in a decrease in vision abilities, and it can also lead to back pain, joint pain and headaches. If possible, try reducing daily screen time.

Going to work 

From farming to construction, some jobs require working with dangerous equipment or substances. Make sure to be aware of and follow workplace safety guidelines to help prevent accident and injury.

Showering 

Slippery floors in the shower can lead to injury or even death. Showers can be especially risky for the elderly and children, who often require help to enter and exit the shower safely. Install a support bar, clean up wet floors and be extra vigilant in the bathroom.

Safety Tips for Your Holiday Party

It’s officially the holiday season, and in between the busyness of stuffing turkeys and stockings comes holiday parties. Whether you’re hosting or attending, it’s likely you’ve got a gathering or two on your calendar this season to share in good cheer with friends, family and neighbors. No matter the occasion for the party, it’s important to ensure everyone stays safe while enjoying the holiday spirit. Keep these safety precautions in mind heading into this season full of celebrations. 

Decorations

Decorating is one of the best ways to get in a holiday mood, but operating around them can sometimes lead to accidents or injuries. When choosing your decorations, select only flame-retardant or noncombustible materials. You should only use indoor lights indoors and outdoor lights outdoors and also not overload electrical outlets. Keep breakable ornaments, decorations, and potentially poisonous plants, including mistletoe, holly berries, etc. out of reach of children. 

Candles, Fireplaces

Candles and a roaring fire can be great for party ambiance and to ease the chill on a winter night. However, you should try to avoid using candles during your party if possible. If you choose to use them, ensure they are far away from any decorations, out of the reach of children and away from any walkways, exits or windows. As for the fireplace, ensure decorations are not placed too close to the heat source. Use a protective screen and make sure the chimney was cleaned at least once in the last year. 

Cords

With decorations, lighting and sound equipment all requiring electricity to power them, cords will inevitably pose some safety issues. Reduce the risk for people to trip over them or spill something on them by tucking cords between the carpet and baseboards. If this isn’t possible, aim to cover the cords in bright, reflective tape or lay a rug or runner over them.  

Serving Alcohol

If you plan on serving alcohol, make sure your guests are over the legal drinking age. Keep people engaged with activities to help prevent anyone from consuming too much too quickly, and make sure to have food and other, non-alcoholic beverages available. Lastly, always ensure your guests have a designated driver, taxi or ride-share option to get them home safely should they consume alcohol. 

Be Vigilant 

You want your guests to have a great time and to make it home safe from the festivities. Help them do this by staying aware and vigilant during the party. Keep an eye out for any spills and clean them up quickly to help prevent slipping hazards and to remove the risk of injury from broken glass or other items.  

Happy holidays from OKFB Insurance! We hope everyone stays safe and enjoys their time with loved ones this season. 

Safeguard Against Fire Risks

October is National Fire Prevention Month, and with 350,000 residential fires occurring each year nationwide, it’s important to know how to protect the structure that’s most important to you. Your home serves as a place of refuge for you and your family, and protecting it from a fire can be simple when you take the necessary preventative steps. Check out this list of tips to help keep your family and home safe from fire damage: 

Do’s and Don’ts of smoke alarms

A smoke alarm is your first line of defense, and we want to reward you for having one. With our fire alarm discount, you may be eligible for a policy discount based on the type of alarm you have installed. Contact an OKFB agent to learn more and see if you qualify.  

It’s important to not only have the proper amount of smoke alarms installed, but also to make sure you test them regularly. The National Fire Protection Association recommends installing smoke alarms inside each bedroom, outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home. Don’t install smoke alarms near windows, doors or ducts where drafts may have an effect on them operating properly. Never paint, decorate or put stickers on the alarms, as this could interfere with them working. 

Test your smoke alarms at least once a month by using the test button. Make sure you follow care instructions that come with the alarm, including cleaning best practices and how often you should replace the battery. The general recommendation is to replace the battery once a year and replace the smoke alarm every 10 years. 

Keep a fire extinguisher nearby 

Install a fire extinguisher on every level of the home and learn how to use it. If the time comes when you need to extinguish a fire around the house, you’ll be able to act quickly. 

Check appliances and cords

Take the time to regularly check your appliances’ cords to ensure they are not old, worn or damaged. Frayed or damaged cords around the house can spark, easily leading to a fire. Try to avoid running cords through high-traffic areas in your home where they may more quickly get worn out or damaged. Also, make sure you’re not overloading outlets or extension cords. Have an electrician install more outlets if you feel you don’t have enough. 

Make safety plans for the family 

One of the simplest ways to help prevent a house fire is by making sure everyone in the home understands the safety precautions. Talk to your children about fire safety and set rules for the household to keep best practices in place. Keep lighters and matches out of reach of children, teach them the importance of blowing out candles when leaving a room and how to identify the sound of smoke alarms. Lastly, create a fire escape plan so everyone is prepared and knows where to go if a fire occurs.

OKFB understands the importance of your home and the role it plays for your family. Protect your dwelling with Home Insurance. Talk to an agent today!